The (Great) Unknown

By Rose Brazilek

Watching the trepidatious first year medical students enter the hallowed halls of building 15 for the first time, it is hard not to get swept up by their wide-eyed enthusiasm and innocent optimism. Phrases such as “I’m definitely going to attend all the meetings of the Disney club” and “I don’t need to pre-read any lectures,” are often heard, phrases they may regret uttering so freely six months from now. However, it was not so long ago that many of us also opened a medical textbook, encountered a cadaver or calculated the exact time until an assignment could be re-submitted on Turnitin for the first time either.

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Medical Student’s Guide to Eating Free in the Hospital

By Robbie Gillies & Marcus Yip

There is no such thing as a free lunch, right? Wrong. This is a myth. In fact, the only certainty in life is that as a Med Student, you will perpetually be both hungry and poor. In recent years a shortage of viable free-food available to students in the hospital has driven the evolution of a cunning and audacious scavenger. For the savvy Med Student, those that are prepared to apply their strong work ethic to mastering the art of ‘free eating’ are finding that the world is their sandwich platter. These are their methods.

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AIatrogenic: Artificial intelligence and medicine

Anonymous

Doctors will be replaced by artificial intelligence (AI).

For the majority of people, reading this sentence triggers a visceral feeling – “surely that will never happen” or “that’s impossible!”. But it’s not a statement that is simply fanciful, nor is it a statement based on blind techno-optimism. Barring the chance of some event that renders humanity extinct, it is safe to say that technology will continue to progress towards human-level intelligence until it is eventually developed. Continue reading

The meteoric rise of technology in medicine

By Rose Brazilek

Harvey Cushing, the renowned neurosurgeon, once wrote of surgery:

“I would like to see the day when somebody would be appointed surgeon somewhere who had no hands, for the operative part is the least part of the work.”

While technology has not yet advanced to such levels, medicine is increasingly shedding its archaic image and beginning to engage with the technological enhancements that characterise the 21st century. However, with this increased uptake comes a new set of challenges, many of which have no precedent. Evolving discussion surrounding the impacts of such technology on patient interaction, education and care is a critical adjunct to the adoption of electronic practices that will ultimately change the face of medicine.

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