Do Better: On the pursuit of perfection

By Mary Crabtree

Do better. Be better. Think better. We are relentlessly slammed with this pressure to do and be and think better. It comes from inside our own heads, and from an illusion that medical students should be able to ‘handle it’. We are inflated by those fleeting moments of praise from a consultant or an inspiring patient encounter, but this feeling is too often swiftly replaced by an overwhelming sense of inadequacy.

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Year 4C: The Premiership Quarter

By Jeremy Cheng

The third quarter of an AFL match has traditionally been coined the “Premiership Quarter”. The quarter where title contenders rush out of the blocks and build an unbeatable lead that brings enough momentum to carry them to victory. The quarter where champions, time and time again, somehow muster the determination and verve to bring out the very best of themselves. The quarter where prior mistakes can be remedied and forgotten. The most important quarter where teams set themselves up for success.

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Your One Stop Self-Care Shop

By Grace Scolyer

There was a stage last year where if I heard my therapist use the term “self-care” one more time, I would have actually screamed. It was such a vague, elusive term that brought to my mind bubble baths and facemasks, green smoothies and 5am runs – a bunch of things that seemed so beneath what I considered to be effective ways of dealing with my symptoms. I didn’t see how adult colouring books were meant to fix my cloudy brain, and I didn’t have the energy in me to give it a go, or the resilience to deal with it inevitably failing to cure me.

So if any part of that resonates with your relationship with the idea of self-care, perhaps this guide will be of some help to you. Self-care isn’t all 10pm technology curfews and yoga; it takes many forms, depending on your experiences, what your busy schedule permits, but most importantly, what you need for yourself.

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An Antidote to Toxic People

By Monique Kowitz

We’ve all encountered them, be it the boss who bullies and demeans you, the colleague who revels in making you look bad, the difficult neighbour, the family member who brings drama every time you see or speak them, or the best friend who constantly flakes on you. What all these people have in common is toxicity. They exude negativity – either consciously or unconsciously – and do nothing to enhance your life. In fact, they do the opposite – they create unnecessary complexity, conflict and, worst of all, stress.

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On the merits of intermitting

By Grace Scolyer & Meg Kent

It is always difficult for medical students to admit they are struggling or not coping with the demands of the course. But it is even more difficult to admit that is has become necessary or important to take time off. We as medical students struggle with self-care, vulnerability and perceived failure so very deeply; where possible, we take part in self-care provided it doesn’t come at the cost of our academic progress. In this piece, Grace and Meg discuss why, sometimes, it is okay to take a break from medicine.

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More than High Yield

By Tamara Hall

“That’s really high yield, focus on that!”

“SUPER high yield.”

“This topic is very high yield…”

If I had a dollar for every time I heard the phrase “high yield” perhaps I wouldn’t be facing such a looming HECS debt upon graduation! I know that people are well-meaning, that we need to focus on what’s considered most vital if we are to get through medical school and not drown in the sheer amount of content it covers. It helps to have a structure to base study around and not lose sight of the forest for the trees. Yet I’ve started to feel quite jaded about the phrase.

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Rest and Recalibrate

By Faye Liu

As the weather gets colder, the financial year draws to an end, and post-exam crammed knowledge slowly escapes our brain, most of us would have entered our mid-year breaks – the perfect time to rest and recalibrate. For some, this may be a long awaited period after a busy first semester, for others, the perfect time to make a trip back home.

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I Promise Myself: The Mental Health Contract

By Grace Scolyer

It’s been 16 months since I sat, tachycardic and sweating in a superclinic GP’s office, asking for a K-10 test and mental health treatment plan. 16 months since I was met with a suppressed laugh, obligatory printout, and subsequent arrangement of an urgent follow-up with another GP with more mental health experience. My exterior did not seem to fit up with my K-10 score; the difference between by 2pm brain and my 2am brain something quite concerning. High functioning, clinically depressed.

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