On Suicide: Let’s Start With Honesty

By Grace Scolyer

“If more people talked about what leads to suicide, if people didn’t talk about it as if it was shameful, if people understood how easily and quickly depression can take over, then there might be fewer deaths.”

-The wife of Dr Andrew Bryant, Brisbane gastroenterologist who committed suicide three weeks ago

I have only ever admitted to three people in the world the deepest extent of the depression. All three of them forced it out of me, asked me at points where I was too weak to lie, to scared not to admit it, terrified of how they would react but even more terrified of what I could do to myself if I kept it in any longer.

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The first time I saw a patient die

By Aaron Kovacs

The first time I ever saw a patient die was just over two years ago, only a month or two into my first clinical placement as a third year medical student. She was an older lady, maybe in her mid sixties, with advanced uterine cancer. The resident and I found her lying on top of her bed, eyes wide and fixed in place, her body rigid as concrete.

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Medical idolisation: The curse and the cure

By Rose Brazilek, Writing Competition First Prize 2016

Topic 3: Does popular culture’s depiction of medicine do more harm than good?

From Scrubs to Grey’s Anatomy, television shows depicting doctors appear to be sure-fire media sensations. Initially omnipotent and superlative in early shows such as Ben Casey and Dr Kildcare, portrayals have shifted to the ‘anti-heroes’ of today in House, Grey’s Anatomy and  ER.  ‘Cultivation theory’ proposes televised narratives are the basis of cultivation of assumptions and conceptions concerning cultural norms, memes and values. It is this theory which may explain the importance of physician portrayal in all forms of media, and how perception of medical professionals has altered as the televised climate has similarly shifted.

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