Changing the dialogue surrounding psychotic illness

By Emily Mogridge

At the suggestion of my supervising psychiatrist, I recently watched the film A Beautiful Mind, a dramatisation of the life of mathematician John Nash and his struggle with schizophrenia. While discussing the film with a friend, she responded asking me if I found the film ‘creepy’ – she had assumed it must have been a horror movie. At no point had I suggested it was a horror film; the only indication I had given was that I mentioned that the protagonist had schizophrenia. It was only a passing comment, but it’s something that has left me mulling over our collective perception of psychotic illness.

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So you want to do a BMedSc(Hons)

By Luigi Zolio

It’s that time of the year when people start to consider whether to take a whole year off from their studies to do … more study! A BMedSci, formally known as Bachelor of Medical Science (Honours), is a one-year research degree that can be undertaken after the completion of Year 3B. It’s a very popular program and a well-established one for people who want to get a proper first-hand experience with research. So how do you go about pursuing it?

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Beyond the Vineyard — A short story

By Madeleine Leung

‘This land, this red land, is us; and the flood years and the dust years and the drought years are us’– John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath

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‘Grace!’ calls a voice from across the crowded living room, filled with the collective laughter of the guests, ‘Grace, come and bring the grapes over here!’ In the corner, a young woman obligingly plucks a bunch from the numerous displays adorning the room. ‘That’s my daughter, Grace, the town beauty to be sure!’ the proud gentleman whispers to the young man beside him. ‘ As smooth and rosy as the grapes we grow here on the block! Here, try some!’.

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Stigma and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Chronic Hurdle

By Matthew Towicz

Personality. It’s a big deal. It develops in our early years and persists across our adult life, governing our daily interactions through to our long-term relationships.

So why is it, that when confronted with disorders of personality, especially borderline personality disorder (BPD), we as clinicians are quick to disregard patients as just being ‘difficult’ or ‘causing trouble?’

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The first time I saw a patient die

By Aaron Kovacs

The first time I ever saw a patient die was just over two years ago, only a month or two into my first clinical placement as a third year medical student. She was an older lady, maybe in her mid sixties, with advanced uterine cancer. The resident and I found her lying on top of her bed, eyes wide and fixed in place, her body rigid as concrete.

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The (Great) Unknown

By Rose Brazilek

Watching the trepidatious first year medical students enter the hallowed halls of building 15 for the first time, it is hard not to get swept up by their wide-eyed enthusiasm and innocent optimism. Phrases such as “I’m definitely going to attend all the meetings of the Disney club” and “I don’t need to pre-read any lectures,” are often heard, phrases they may regret uttering so freely six months from now. However, it was not so long ago that many of us also opened a medical textbook, encountered a cadaver or calculated the exact time until an assignment could be re-submitted on Turnitin for the first time either.

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